Pattas: Dhanush and Sneha strive to lift this wholly predictable film that lacks soaring highs

“The efficacy of such films is decided by the individual moments within, and whether or not the highs and the lows of the film impact you as they should. Remember when Devasena feels instinctively, in her bones, that her son is close? Remember what you felt as Baahubali runs to his mother in chains, his enemies behind him, as music and slow-mo visuals combined to deliver a classic mass moment? The problem with Pattas is that its highs don’t overwhelm you, its lows don’t shatter you.”

The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir: An extraordinarily ordinary journey

“I think it’s fair to say we almost know exactly what to expect every time an international production begins to make a film with an Indian protagonist. Of course, he’s going to be from Mumbai, and he’s going to be poor (this film takes it a step further by making him narrate his story, in all its ‘wisdom and beauty’ to a fawning audience made up of four poor Indian boys about to be incarcerated).”

Vada Chennai: A gritty, even if rushed, gangster drama with unforgettable stretches

“In the other murder sequence, you have two novices undergoing a rite of passage of sorts. The event is the equivalent of two young lion cubs hunting a weary hyena. It’s fascinating to see as they, full of vigour and inventiveness, wake up to what they can actually do. It’s a sequence Santosh Narayanan’s music stands out in.”

Don-u don-u don-u

“You have to wonder when we went from being repulsed by these outlaws to rooting for them. When indeed did our filmmakers begin to conceive a don as a cool leader, his violent tendencies, like in Maari, supposedly an amusing extension of his proclivity for mischief.”

Cracking Kolaveri

“So, why did an entire generation get hooked to it? Well, that’s a question I suspect both Anirudh and Dhanush are tired of trying to answer, and perhaps trying to figure out too.”

The X man

Imagine if people, about 50 years later, still didn’t know who composed the music for this film. That would have been quite cool, no?”

VIP 2: Cashing in on the popularity of the first

“His father, meanwhile, has bright ideas of his own, which include revolutionary solutions like buying ‘malligapoo’ because it apparently worked when he was having a tough time with his wife. If I were Raghuvaran, my ears, no doubt, would have been bleeding. No child should ever have to deal with the misery of having to listen to how their parents turned each other on.”