Death and resurrection in the greatest 15 minutes of Selvaraghavan

“If you remember, it’s a film in which the woman, Anita, tolerates quite a bit. Kathir is ill-mannered and brutish, a quintessential Selvaraghavan central male character if you will. This one also ogles, misbehaves, abuses, stalks… He is pathetic. And she can’t seem to fend him off. Instead, like a germ, he ends up growing on her. He’s almost an infection, a flaw. He’s… human. She’s an epitome of patience, a giver. She’s… an angel, a goddess. He’s a sinner; she’s his saviour.”

The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir: An extraordinarily ordinary journey

“I think it’s fair to say we almost know exactly what to expect every time an international production begins to make a film with an Indian protagonist. Of course, he’s going to be from Mumbai, and he’s going to be poor (this film takes it a step further by making him narrate his story, in all its ‘wisdom and beauty’ to a fawning audience made up of four poor Indian boys about to be incarcerated).”

The Ilaiyaraaja interview

“Dressed in white, as though he needed further deifying, he sits in front of you, waiting for your first question. You blurt out astonishment that he’s worked on more than 1,000 films, more than 7,000 songs, and more than 20,000 concerts. It’s astronomical, and it’s almost frightening. “

A loveable monster

“The moving kindness at the heart of this film makes it an important film for children.”

NGK Movie Review: Few memorable moments in an underwhelming Selvaraghavan film

“The state of today’s politics is best illustrated by a scene in NGK when the eponymous protagonist, Nanda Gopalan Kumaran (Suriya turning up, as always), returns to his family after consenting to join a political party. You’d think he just told them he’s been diagnosed with terminal illness.”